Travel to a course in grad school

One of the absolutely best (and most fun) things that I did in graduate school was to take a course at Cold Spring Harbor. I encourage every student to consider doing this to learn more about your field or to learn a unique skill. I asked one of our students to give you her tips after she also went to a course and she did a better job than I could of outlining these opportunities. You should follow her path!
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Resilience through a PhD

It has been some time since I’ve posted, but I am starting back with a strong post with tips on building resilience as you pursue research. This is something I constantly struggled with through my graduate degree, so I asked someone I consider to be an expert at this, my twin sister! She obtained her PhD in Cell and Developmental Biology at Vanderbilt and is now a postdoc at Yale. Check out these tips from Becky Adams.
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I Can’t Wait to Fail: The path to a science career has more than two routes

The importance of career development through your graduate studies cannot be overstated. No matter your career goals, graduate school is about differentiating yourself and carving your own path. Today I’d like to highlight an article written by one of our very own, Lorena Infante, on her path to Science Writing. I think you’ll find her journey truly inspiring!

Keeping up with the Literature

“Young scientists sometimes tend to neglect the literature. They look at a number of related papers when they start working on their project, but then they fail to keep looking for more papers as their research—and the work of other researchers—progresses.” “Remember that we walk on the shoulders of giants.” “At the early stages of your research career, it’s especially important that you take the time each day to get up to speed with the literature. I would recommend trying the different tools available and experimenting with your reading routine until you find what works for you.”

I pulled this intro from this recent article published by Science. Check out tips and tools from scientists by reading the article!

Seeking comfort in the discomfort: How to approach your first year

Today I will be starting a blog post series on the challenges and rewards of starting a new PhD program. I hope to write every couple of weeks, so keep an eye out for the links below to become active!

As a primer, Science just published and advice column with thoughts from upper-level graduate students. It is a great start to these important topics!

Why study that, Jim Patton?

What is better than hearing why a scientist is studying what she or he is studying? To me, this personal aspect of science is my favorite. Because our faculty are indeed people, I am adding a new feature to my blog where I ask a faculty member each month: “Why?”. I ask them to describe their work in the context of their interests. We’ll start with our IGP director, Jim Patton. What does he find most interesting about his work?
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The basics of the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program

Admission into most biomedical PhD programs come with tuition coverage and a stipend. However, as a young scientist, you have the opportunity to fund yourself by obtaining your own competitive fellowship. Writing for your own funding at this stage is a great training opportunity, and receiving a fellowship can make you a more attractive candidate for graduate program admission or for postdoctoral positions. Read on for an introduction to the most broad fellowship for prospective and early graduate students, the NSF GRFP.

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